Journal / Pedestrianism

  • The Beeley & Chatsworth Estate

    I've explored these parts many times on the road bike, both the road and rough-stuff from the top of Beeley Moor. I've noticed a few footpaths and bridleways that I thought would be worth checking out on foot.  The influence of Chatsworth house on the surrounding villages of Pilsley, Edensor and Beeley can be felt in this area, for over two centuries Beeley was effectively an estate village belonging to the successive Dukes of Devonshire.  Many of the properties now have been sold-off but the village pub, The Devonshire Arms, has been brought back into the Duke's control in recent years. Formally three...

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  • Lathkill Dale & The Limestone Way

    “Lathkill is, by many degrees, the purest, the most transparent stream that I ever yet saw either at home or abroad…” ~ Charles Cotton, 1676  If you park at the Lathkill Hotel at Over Haddon as we did, you can walk down the winding lane to the Lathkill lodge, or you can ride here but you’ll need a change of shoes in your saddle bag, or cycling shoes that are ok for walking (the route is approx 8 miles).  Before you reach the lodge, you will turn right onto this beautiful limestone dale next to the River Lathkill. Down here,...

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  • The Upper Derwent Valley

    We started our walk at the Cutthroat Bridge car park on the A57. I have walked and cycled around the woodland-fringed parts of the Derwent and Ladybower reservoirs many times so I decided a different approach was necessary.  I have never been up to the Millstone grit escarpment that lies on Derwent Edge and when you get up to the junction and the moors that lie above, it feels altogether different in contrast to the valley, much of which is clothed in woodland and braken. The steep-sided valley edge gives way to miles of bare and largely featureless moorland apart...

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  • Alport Castles - The UK's Biggest Landslide

    We started our walk at 10am in the Derwert Valley beneath the stone ramparts of the Derwent dam with a cup of tea. Fairholmes car-park apparently has a history of its own, I found this out afterwards after noticing the crumbling foundation of the farm and doing some research when I got home. During the construction of the reservoirs the car-park was a masons’ yard it would have likely reverberated the sounds of workers' cutting and shaping stone for the the dams.    Leaving the valley our route climbs up through Lockerbrook Coppice. Leaving the trees, the route follows the top edge of...

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  • Pedestrianism

    Pedestrian - a person travelling on foot; walker. Pedestrianism - The act, art, or practice of a pedestrian; walking or running; travelling or racing on foot. Pedestrianism was a unique sport which is said to have come from aristocrats in the late 17th century pitting their carriage footmen, constrained to walk by the speed of their masters' carriages, against one another. This became a firm fixture at country fairs much like horse racing, where pedestrians with support from trainers would grind out gruelling distances of up to a 100 miles per day and night for 6 days. This was over...

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  • The Round of Kinder Plateaux

    The majority of Yompers leave Edale village by way of Grindsbrook. On the 16th December myself, Andy Mac and Pat took the same path at 0712 and headed up the Pennine Way highway. In winter conditions the hillside of Grindslow Knoll is probably the most popular ski-slope in the Peak District. On this day, skiing would have been possible.  Our route lie North-West near the head of Crowden Clough. Black ice was underfoot, our speed was probably a-third of normal pace. We looked for and found 'wool packs' or 'The Mushroom Garden' or 'Whipsnade', depending on what you like to call it and...

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