Journal / Cycling

  • Fluid Mechanics #4 ~ Andrei Tchmil

    10th April, 1994. 167.8 miles PARIS ~ ROUBAIX Easily recognizable with his signature grimace, old-style helmet, and powerful riding style. The only cyclist to have four nationalities. A retired Soviet (until 1991), Moldovan (1992–1995), Ukrainian (1995–1998) and Belgian (since 1998). In an apocalyptic maelstrom of mud, blood, and cobblestones he won alone that day with an advantage of over a minute in front of Fabio Baldato and Franco Ballerini. Tchmil used Rock Shox Paris~Roubaix SL suspension folks which subsequently  launched an 'ad-blitz' for the product.  The race time that day was 7h 28' 02" At the age of 31 Andrei...

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  • Fluid Mechanics #3 ~ Jacky Durand

    The 76th running of The Tour of Flanders was held on Sunday the 5th of April, 1992.  For the first time in the Ronde van Vlaanderen, a rider from the early breakaway stayed ahead until the finish ~ that rider was Jacky Durand.  The race started in Sint-Niklass and finished in Meerbeke, a total of 257km and featured 14 categorised climbs including the Paterberg, Muur-Kapelmuur and the Oude Kwaremont.  Durand broke away with Thomas Wegmuller and two others after only a quarter of the race. There was 217km still to ride.  By the time the escape reached the first climb their lead was 24 minutes.  That...

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  • Q&A with Josie Dew

    I was given a copy of The Wind in My Wheels when I first got into cycling just under a decade ago. A travelogue which detailed the experience of the English touring cyclist Josie Dew.  At that time, I had read numerous cycling books but mainly about professional bike racing. I found Josie’s book inspiring and it gave me a different perspective on the bike. Although a caterer by profession, Josie frequently takes long cycle tours and then writes books about her trips, full of humour and human observation. Sometimes putting herself in mortal danger - all in the name of...

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  • Fluid Mechanics #1 ~ Gianni Bugno

    In 1990 the Italian Gianni Bugno won Milan ~ San Remo in very classy fashion. Crosswinds along the Riviera had broken up the peloton, scattering the riders into three large echelons. Angelo Canzonieri took a punt off the front after passing Imperia. Bugno followed the move. On the Cipressa, with his upper body still, arms fixed on the hoods, turning over a huge gear, Bugno dropped Canzonieri effortlessly and took off solo. He held 18 seconds at the top of the Cipressa and 15 seconds on the Poggio. Rolf Golz stalked Bugno all the way to San Remo ~ Bugno...

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  • Local Riders Q&A - Gary Speight

    Gary Speight was a road racing cyclist from Doncaster, South Yorkshire. He started riding at the age of 13 years old after his Dad bought him a bike from a local auction for £15 - A 25" Puch frame, which enabled Gary to ride to his (then) girlfriends house, instead of catching the bus! Soon after he joined the Rotherham Wheelers in 1982 and began to take bike riding more seriously after riding from Doncaster to Castleton at the age of 15. He described this as "a great feeling". He then joined the Chesterfield Couriers the next year.  In 1985 he went with a local friend Steve Goff (Rutland.CC) to Belgium for...

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  • Q&A with Henk Francino of The RSF

    Before Mamnick I was dealing in vintage clothing, my weekends were spent riding the bike and traveling the UK to bicycle jumble sales, looking for deals. Before the big boom in the vintage market and old school bikes becoming cool, you could pick-up all sorts of top-end bike parts from the 50s-90s for next to nothing. I rarely bought bike parts to sell-on, I was building a collection of bits for my own bikes, for when current parts wore-out and needed replacing. I have many parts still sitting in my cellar, ready for when they need using. During this time I came across an issue of the Rough...

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  • Local Riders Q&A - Chris Sidwells

    Chris Sidwells is an author and editor who’s writing has featured in many magazines and websites including Cycle Sport, Cycling Weekly, The Guardian, The BBC and The Sunday Times. He has written best-selling books about cycling and contributed to many others.  Chris’s latest offering is his own publishing brand - Cycling Legends (www.cyclinglegends.co.uk) a website with free-to-read exclusive content. In November 2018 Cycling Legends published 01 Tom Simpson the first book of a series of beautiful illustrated publications which were are proud to stock at Mamnick HQ Sheffield.      _____________________________________________________________________ Which are your favourite stretches of road to ride on...

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  • Local Rides Q&A - Colin Sturgess

    Colin Sturgess,  is a former English road and track cyclist who enjoyed a 14 year career between 1986 and 2000. He won gold and bronze in the individual pursuit on the track at the world championships in 1989 and 1991. He won the British National Race Road Champs in 1990 on the road. Born in Ossett, Wakefield, Colin turned professional after the 1988 Olympic Games and rode for Greg LeMond at the iconic ADR team.  Colin has also worked as a wine maker and wine educator near Sydney, Australia, winning national awards for this work. __________________________________________________________________________ As a racing cyclist,...

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  • On Brands and Authenticity

    Perhaps it’s because my introduction to the bike was guided by a handful of old-school club riders who had earned their spurs riding and racing in a time long before cycling became cool. Cyclists’ were often seen as outsiders. Often exposed to piss-taking and ridicule from those that simply 'don’t get it’.  Winter riding where I come from consists of riding a trusted steel or aluminium winter bike with full (proper) clearance for mudguards and vitally important mudflap. Usually tyres would be nothing less than 28mm, sometimes with tread. Plenty of clearance for off-roading, perhaps a bike with a longer...

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  • Contemplating Yomp

    "If everybody is doing it one way, there is a good chance you can find your niche by going exactly in the opposite direction" - Sam Walton  Sticking a label on the way you ride seems limiting. It goes against the spirit of cycling to me. Putting people into groups rather than seeing people as individuals is tribal. This can be problematic in the form of bike-riding, politics, thinking and all the vague post-modernist crap in-between!   Regarding the bike, geography plays a big part - where you live influences your choice of rides which can influence the way you...

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